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science Articles
How often do asteroids hit Earth? You may suppose such events occur more often in movies than real life, but you’d be wrong. This week, three astronauts revealed that Earth’s been pummelled 26 times by asteroids since the turn of the millennium.

New variant of Ebola virus detected

Researchers have published some initial findings on the characteristics of the Ebola virus discovered in Guinea. Initial virological investigations enabled them to identify Zaire ebolavirus as the pathogen responsible for this epidemic.

New tuberculosis drug regimen moves to clinical trial

A new drug, part of the STAND trial, will test the first regimen designed to significantly shorten and simplify the treatment of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant TB.

New centre to study Huntington's Disease Special

Two new comprehensive, multidisciplinary centers to study Huntington's Disease have opened. The centers focus on care, education and research. Digital Journal has found out more about the project.

U.S. public at odds with ‘scientific opinion’

A new poll suggests that sizable chunk of U.S. citizens disagree with scientists and what is — and is not — scientific fact.

Op-Ed: PBS - Cloning woolly mammoths might prevent Arctic meltdown

Researchers on an Earth Day PBS broadcast presented by Judy Woodruff hypothesized that cloning can be used to create a Frankenstein woolly mammoth species that would keep Arctic ice from melting.

Insight into pathogenic fungus

The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes yeast infections, diaper rashes and oral thrush, and is the most common fungal pathogen to infect humans. Researchers have identified a protein that the fungus uses to defend itself against the human body.

Survival of mass extinctions linked to less picky eating

Children are often scolded by their parents when they don't eat all the food on their plate, but researchers have discovered that picky eaters are also less likely to survive mass extinctions.

New ‘natural antidepressant’ reported

A substance, called neuritin, has been heralded as a natural antidepressant. The substance is found in the brain and it has a role in nerve transmission.

Link between Down syndrome and leukemia found

A link between people with Down syndrome and people at a heightened risk of developing leukemia during childhood has been uncovered through a new study harnessing advanced medical testing.

Enough already! Insects found in Brazil have sex up to 70 hours

Cave insects of the Neotrogla genus recently discovered in Brazil have two things to make them rather unique. First, it's the female who is equipped with a penis, while the male gets the vagina. And secondly they have sex for 40 to 70 hours — straight

Small prehistoric animal provides a glimpse into early herbivores

Scuttling around in its ancient world, this minute carnivore is the earliest member of a lineage that gave rise to rhino-sized herbivores

Op-Ed: Martian erosion, or alien is as alien does?

If you spend enough time looking at Martian geology, you wind up with more questions than answers. Photos from JPL show a very interesting, very puzzling type of Martian sandstone. It’s a jumble of questions.

Possibly habitable planet spotted 500 light-years away

An earth-size planet orbiting in its sun's habitable zone has been spotted for the first time, U.S. space scientists announced Thursday.

Should the U.S. prohibit reproductive cloning? Special

Researchers have produced stem cell lines using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) from cells, making human reproductive cloning more technically feasible. Is this a good idea?

Experts seek to improve the lives of those living with paralysis Special

Canadian and Chinese experts have joined forces to improve the lives of those living with paralysis after spinal cord injury around the world.

New test for pork virus

A virus in the U.S. has killed over 6 million pigs. Researchers have developed a new test to monitor for the disease. The hope is that improved detection can be used to slow down the rate of infection.

Female sports penis in sex-reversed newly discovered species

Researchers have discovered little-known cave insects in Brazil with odd sexual habits. The troglodyte species has sex-reversed genitalia, the female sporting an elaborate spiked penis that penetrates an opening like a vagina in her male consort.

Gene linked to pediatric kidney cancer

A type of pediatric kidney cancer has been linked to a specific gene, called Lin28, according to new research. Understanding this could lead to a new treatment.

Clue for hepatitis C survival

Scientists have identified why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long. The answer is that the virus attacks the liver cells' energy centers.

HIV risks lower with good bacteria

A science team have grown vaginal skin cells outside of the human body and have studied the way that the cells interact with groups of 'good and bad' bacteria.

Senator takes on antibiotic resistant organisms Special

With so-called “super bugs” on the rise, U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) has introduced a bill aimed at slowing down the rate of antibiotic resistant microorganisms.

Scientists makes graphene breakthrough

Researchers have made a key development in relation to the commercialization of grapheme. Graphene is a unique material ideally suited for electronic devices.

Researcher creates microscope made of almost entirely paper

A scientist has created a microscope out of mostly paper that will cost less than a dollar -- far less than the several hundred dollars most reasonable ones would cost. It will magnify objects 2,100 times and can help in fighting serious diseases.

Space station science offers clues about pathogenic fungi

During an investigation dubbed "Microbe," using the environment aboard space shuttle Atlantis, researchers gained a better understanding of pathogenic fungi.

New treatment for brain tumors

A herpes virus, that has been genetically manipulated, has been used along with radiation to treat a form of brain cancer, according to a new study.

New flu target identified

A protein produced by the flu virus helps it outwit one of our body's natural defense mechanisms. This makes the protein a potentially good target for antiviral drugs directed against the influenza A virus.

USA should be prime viewing for Tuesday's red moon

There's going to be a red moon rising over North America early Tuesday morning, only it's not exactly red but only looks that way.

Protein clue for schizophrenia origin

As part of a hunt for the causes of schizophrenia, researchers have analyzed proteins in the brains of rats that have been given hallucinogenic drugs.

Op-Ed: Ocean acidity causes fish to go looking for their predators

Studies of the effects of carbonic acid, the CO2 related acid formed by carbon emissions and underwater volcanoes have shown that fish affected by the acid actually go looking for their predators.

Good beers need new yeasts

Beer is the most widely consumed alcoholic beverage on the planet. Good beer requires good quality yeasts and researchers are continuing to hunt for new strains.

Study finds excessive CO2 makes ocean fish fearless

A joint Australian and American research team has found fish exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide experience a change in behavior, making them bolder. Instead of fleeing from predators, they seem to be attracted to them.

Cave-dwelling fish offers clues to human facial problems

A genetic association has been discovered with facial asymmetry in an ancient cavefish and facial asymmetries in humans. Researchers hope to understand why genes behave differently on the right versus the left sides of the human face.

Early risers can catch spectacular 'Blood Moon' lunar eclipse

Sky watchers across much of North America will get the chance to witness a total lunar eclipse for several hours on Tuesday, April 15 — but only if they rise early.

Gut bacteria influence colon cancer progression

Researchers have demonstrated that gut bacteria can change the environment in a way that promotes the growth and spread of tumors. The results suggest that bacterial proteins may suppress DNA repair proteins within the cells that line the colon.

Four amazing facts to know about camels

While closely related to the four South American camelids (llamas, alpacas, guanaco, and vicuña) true camels have amazing and odd adaptations helping them survive the worlds harshest environments.

What can nanomedicine deliver?

Only a few nanotherapeutics are currently on the market. However, dozens more are making their way through preclinical studies and clinical trials. What is special about this medical development?

How cancer cells are 'put back together'

As some cancer cells are destroyed they can sometimes survive and piece themselves back together. The results offer insight on how cancer cells might be able to withstand chemotherapy.

Lab grown muscle self-repairs

Implanted into mice, scientists show that laboratory reared muscle, made from stem cells, can heal itself after an injury.

Smelling while sleeping can affect memory

The brain’s ability to properly store information about different scents can be disrupted by introducing new sensory stimulation during deep sleep. This is according research using mice.

Scientists regrow mouse thymus

Using a simple genetic formula, scientists have been able to coax a shrunken mouse thymus to regenerate. This is the first report of the regeneration of a whole, aged organ by a single factor.
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