Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.
Connect
Log In Sign Up
health Articles
The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, or MERS, has taken two more lives in Saudi Arabia. The country's health ministry also report 13 more known cases. MERS is related to the SARS, which appeared in about 37 countries a decade ago.

Epidural corticosteroid injection warning

The U.S. FDA is warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare but serious adverse events, including loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death.

How to deal with the most common allergy problems Special

A leading doctor has said that around 55 percent of people suffer from allergies. Most people are allergic to something, such as pollen, dander, dairy products, gluten, and mold. Digital Journal caught up with the medic to find out more.

Passive smoking and obesity link

Scientists suggest that there is a link between long-term exposure to passive smoking and a risk of Type 2 diabetes in adults. The diabetes is, in turn, connected with obesity.

Ginseng can treat the flu

Ginseng can help treat and prevent the flu and other respiratory viruses that infect the lungs and breathing passages, according to new research findings.

Why stress is the root of hair problems Special

A little care at the right moment could keep the hair on a lot of heads, and that goes for women too, according to Andrew Bernard.

Health Canada has company recall batch of medical marijuana

An inspection of Greenleaf Medicinals of British Columbia by Health Canada has resulted in the medical marijuana supplier voluntarily recalling its Purple Kush (Batch PK-10-20-13)) shipment of pot. The recall went into effect April 18.

Op-Ed: Violence against healthcare workers ‘endemic’ — New study

The Lancet has published a truly appalling report on the subject of violence against healthcare workers. This is now a global plague, and the prognosis is anything but good.

Study shows fitness trackers help older people lose weight

A study from Wake Forest University in the U.S. shows the use of fitness trackers helps older people to lose weight. The researchers worked with 48 obese persons from 65 to 79 for ten months.

Portland dumps 38 million gallons of water after man pees in it

The city of Portland has emptied out a water reservoir that had been full of 38 million gallons of the city's drinking water. Why? Because video surveillance caught a 19-year-old man urinating into the water.

Study finds couples who sleep close together are happier

A study from the University of Hertfordshire in the U.K. polled 1,000 people about how they sleep with their partner. The study found that the closer couples slept to one another, the happier they are.

Study of young marijuana users' brains shows abnormalities

An American study on young people who use marijuana up to 4 times each week has found their brains show abnormalities that could indicate cognitive problems. The study was published in the Wednesday issue of the 'Journal of Neurosciences.'

New study finds casual pot use alters the brain

Young adults who occasionally use pot show abnormalities in two key areas of their brain related to emotion, motivation, and decision making, new research reveals.

Spanking children may encourage more bad behavior, study says

A new study into the effects of corporal punishment on children suggests that spanking a child encourages them to misbehave more often.

Hospital visits fell when seniors got drug coverage

Eleven years ago Bob Bennett, then a Republican senator from Utah, made a fiscal sales pitch for including prescription drugs in Medicare coverage for seniors.

Seven biggest fertility misconceptions Special

In honor of National Infertility Awareness Week on April 20-26, the physician team at Fertility Centers of Illinois shares with Digital Journal the seven biggest fertility misconceptions they hear in their offices.

Canadians' mental health records shared with FBI, border patrol

Canadian police departments have been sharing mental health information of Canadians by uploading it to a database that the FBI and U.S. Customs has access to, which has been used to deny entry by border control agents.

Man becomes organ donor, shoots himself in the head

A 50-year-old man walked into University Hospital La Fe in Valencia, Spain on Monday morning with a revolver hidden in his belt. After applying to become an organ donor, he committed suicide in the bathroom.

Brain scan shows which vegetative patients have hope

A hi-tech scanner can help tell whether a brain-injured patient who appears to be in a vegetative state has a chance of regaining some consciousness, a study said Tuesday.

Goat to be cloned to treat rare genetic disorder

Scientists in Brazil have genetically modified a goat to produce milk with an enzyme to treat a rare genetic disorder, O Estado de Sao Paulo newspaper reported Tuesday.The goat, named "Gluca," is the first of its kind in South America.

Jillian Michaels is a 'natural' on her new tour

"I have a secret," Jillian Michaels, a well-respected health and fitness expert of "The Biggest Loser" fame, said last week during a stop on her nationwide tour at Rialto Square Theatre in Joliet, Illinois.

Op-Ed: Doctors discourage others from joining the profession

According to The Daily Beast, nine out of 10 doctors discourage others from joining the profession, and 300 physicians commit suicide every year. A few years ago, physicians were named as having the second-most suicidal occupation.

Is Kombucha really the 'elixir of life'?

Kombucha, often referred to as the "elixir of life" due to its numerous potential health benefits, has raised some controversy as it became popular in recent years.

Why acupuncture can alleviate suffering for your pets Promoted

Although it's long been used on humans to manage pain, acupuncture isn't commonly associated with pet health. But clinics and pet owners are seeing a growth in pet acupuncture so much so it's hard to deny the method's efficacy.

Chinese herbal medicine has potential for treating hepatitis C

A compound isolated from Chinese herbal medicines that was found to inhibit hepatitis C activity by approximately 90 percent. The compound is isolated from a herb.

Study finds low blood sugar makes married couples' fights worse

Scientists at Ohio State University have published a study which suggests low blood sugar can cause big-time arguments among married couples. The study also supports a long-held notion that hungry people are more prone to anger than the well-fed.

Low blood sugar bad for marital bliss: study

Low blood sugar isn't good for marital bliss because it makes spouses more prone to anger and aggression, says a new study.

US lawmakers: no e-cigarette sales or ads to youths

US lawmakers want electronic cigarettes to be treated just like tobacco products when it comes to barring the sales and marketing of the controversial devices to children.

Chinese herb beats drug at rheumatoid arthritis: study

A Chinese herb called thunder god vine works better than a widely-prescribed pharmaceutical drug at easing rheumatoid arthritis, a study published on Monday said.

Low blood sugar bad for marital bliss: study

Low blood sugar isn't good for marital bliss because it makes spouses more prone to anger and aggression, says a new study out Monday.

Pakistan to use polio vaccine checkpoints in Taliban areas

Pakistani officials said Monday they would begin administering polio vaccines to children at security checkpoints in the country's lawless tribal belt to protect against Taliban attacks.

Seven eye health problems you didn’t know Special

Your eyes are a window into your overall health, and it’s important to get your eyes checked even if you don’t think you have vision problems, according to a lead eye specialist.

Breakthrough Hepatitis C drug cures 90% of patients in 12 weeks

A new hepatitis C drug is being hailed as a "major breakthrough" by scientists and a "turning point" in the fight for a cure. The research was conducted in four countries and lead by scientists at the University of Texas Health Science Center.

Only 1 in 10 women know that they face risks to their eyes

A new national survey has revealed that only 9 percent of U.S. women realize that women are at greater risk of permanent vision loss than men. This news comes during a month dedicated to women’s eye health issues.

Increase in e-cigarette-related calls to poison centers

The number of calls to poison centers involving e-cigarette liquids containing nicotine rose from one per month in September 2010 to 215 per month in February 2014, according to the U.S. CDC.

Japan stem cell body splashes cash on luxury furniture

A publicly-funded research institute in Japan, already embattled after accusing one of its own stem cell scientists of faking data, has spent tens of thousands of dollars on designer Italian furniture, reportedly to use up its budget.

Global tobacco control hampered by low government spending

According to the U.S. CDC, less than $1 billion is spent globally on tobacco control, with 97 percent of the spending done by high-income countries. In contrast, governments worldwide collect nearly $133 billion in tobacco excise tax revenue each year.

Italy IVF patient pregnant with wrong embryos: Report

A woman who underwent fertility treatment at a clinic in Rome became pregnant with the twins of another couple after their embryos were mixed up, press reports said Sunday.

FDA issues cat food recall due to salmonella risk to humans

The FDA announced that the Robert Abady Dog Food Co. recalled one of their cat food products because of a potential health risk for both cats and humans. The risk is high for young children and the aged, the FDA said last week.

Doctor says range of effective hair-loss treatments on the way

At the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology in Denver there was considerable optimism expressed for those who'd like to reverse their hair-loss. There are multiple manners of treating hair-loss, Dr. Kenneth Washenik said.

Japan orders chicken cull after bird flu outbreak in south

Japan has ordered the slaughter of some 112,000 chickens after officials confirmed Sunday bird flu infections at a poultry farm in the south.
Latest News
Top News
Engage

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers